How to: Make Bias Binding

I recently had the need to make bias binding and I was really surprised that I could not find a tutorial geared towards quilters that actually made sense to me. I realized I couldn’t be the only one who had a hard time finding something without frustration and decided I’d make a tutorial the next time I made bias binding.

Start with your yardage laid out like this. It would probably be wise to press it first. If your top line of your fabric isn’t straight, make sure it is. 🙂

Fold the selvage up to the top line of the fabric.

Fold again, but bringing the top down following the diagonal line. This is your bias and where you will cut. Continue folding along this same line until your fabric is a small enough packet you can cut it.

Turn your fabric so you can use the markings on your cutting mat.

Cut off the far right edge to make it straight.

Now you can cut your binding at whatever width you desire. I use 2-1/4″. When you cut bias binding, you will end up with 2 strips from each cut.

If you are attaching it to a scalloped or curved edge quilt, I highly recommend doing a stay stitch around the edge of the quilt before you trim it and before you attach the binding. This helps keep the bias edges of the quilt from stretching too much.

Fat Quarter Shop Quiltalong: Mini Charm Chocolates

 

Do you have a collection of mini charm packs or am I the only one? I never, ever know what to do with them. I’ve used them to make pouches in the past, but there are ALWAYS, always mini charms left over. When Fat Quarter Shop opened up participation in this quiltalong, I was so excited because this quilt uses mini charms!!!!!!!!! The shortcut version I made is a small baby quilt, and it uses 4 mini charm packs. I chose to use Modern Background Luster Metallic by Zen Chic for Moda, but could you imagine making a bigger version and mixing different lines of mini charms together? It would be such a fun quilt and it would be a great stash buster. The components for this quilt come together very quickly and will definitely be a quilt I’ll be making again. To get the free pattern, visit The Jolly Jabber, Fat Quarter Shop’s blog and then get to stash shopping!

Moda Bella Solids Challenge

Back in February when Moda announced their Bella Solids Challenge, I immediately knew I wanted to participate. I had a rough idea come to me, which I sketched out, then got to work. The colors they chose were a real challenge…. more so than coming up with an original idea. They are SO bright and not my normal style (there’s no pink or aqua and definitely orange, yellow, red, purple, and lime green).

The parameters for the competition were to create a modern, 72″ x 90″ finished quilt, using all 12 colors in an original design. I have always loved the Dutchman’s Puzzle traditional quilt block. I love it even more because my husband’s family has a huge Dutch heritage on both sides. I wanted to do a spin on the Dutchman’s Puzzle block and make a minimal quilt. Nothing feels more Modern to me than a minimalistic quilt. It takes a huge amount of restraint to go minimal. It is so much easier to overdo things than to hold back.

In this quilt, which I named Dutchman’s Dilemma, there are several iterations of the Dutchman’s puzzle block with some elements omitted. I am so proud of this quilt, even though it did not win. I had Marion McClellan quilt this in a “graffiti” style to help add movement and fill in the blank space that I intentionally left knowing Marion would fill it in with amazing motifs. She blew me away. Some have asked if I’ll choose to enter a competition of this kind again. At this point, I am not sure. It was a process that caused me to grow, but also was really hard to get the box of shame back in the mail. For now, I’m glad I participated and hope to make this quilt again out of fabrics of my choosing and maybe release a pattern for it in the future.